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Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Maintaining the momentum in post-Green Revolution agriculture found in the catalog.

Maintaining the momentum in post-Green Revolution agriculture

Derek Byerlee

Maintaining the momentum in post-Green Revolution agriculture

a micro-level perspective from Asia.

by Derek Byerlee

  • 363 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by Department of Agricultural Economics, Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesMSU international development paper -- no. 10
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13915966M

Overview of Agricultural Marketing 72 consumers, and to maintain buffer stock to guard against adverse impact of year to year fluctuations in output on price stability. These two institutions have mainly benefited rice and wheat crops which are the major cereals and staple food for the country. III. Post Green Revolution Period. the development of agriculture. In sum, India had to pay a huge cost for the sake of the negligence of agriculture at the time until the mids, which is considered to be a typical case of the „Ricardian trap‟ in economic development (Hayami, ). The first wave of the Green Revolution in India had another limitation from the viewpoint of.

Examining the Post-Green Revolution Transition India has enjoyed rapid economic growth over the past forty years, GDP per capita (PPP$) accelerating from less than 1% in the s to over % in the s (World Bank, ). As incomes have risen, consumer . How was agriculture after the green revolution different from agriculture before the green revolution? large amounts of chemicals were used, modern methods, and machinery evolved Why has grain production in the US decreased since ?

Agricultural research systems all over the world are acclaimed for their significant contributions to food and nutritional security and poverty alleviation. There is empirical evidence of agricultural growth induced by the Green Revolution technologies having benefited the rural and urban poor through reduction in food prices. Although the impact in terms of poverty reduction has multiplied. Byerlee, Derek R., "Maintaining the Momentum in Post-Green Revolution Agriculture: A Micro-Level Perspective from Asia," Food Security International Development Papers , Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics. Evans, Paul & .


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Maintaining the momentum in post-Green Revolution agriculture by Derek Byerlee Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. Maintaining the momentum in post-green revolution agriculture: a micro-level perspective from Asia. [Derek Byerlee]. Maintaining the Momentum in Post-Green Revolution Agriculture: A Micro-Level Perspective from Asia Article (PDF Available) February with Reads How we measure 'reads'Author: Derek Byerlee.

MAINTAINING THE MOMENTUM IN POST-GREEN REVOLUTION AGRICULTURE: A MICRO-LEVEL PERSPECTIVE FROM ASIA by Derek Byerlee This paper is published by the Department of Agricultural Economics, Michigan State University. ** The author is an Economist with CIMMYT, Mexico and formerly South Asian Regional Economist with CIMMYT based in Islamabad.

The book recounts how the high achievements of the Green Revolution had overgrown to a state of this ‘agrarian crisis’. In the process, it also brings to fore the underlying resilience and innovativeness in the sector which enabled it not just to survive through the crisis but to Author: Binoy Goswami, Madhurjya Prasad Bezbaruah, Raju Mandal.

A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text.

This book attempts to capture the challenges faced by Indian agriculture through the post Green Revolution period and assesses its readiness to face emerging challenges.

Through 14 chapters, the book weaves together the passage of the Indian agriculture through its various achievements, and emphasizes on the past five decades.

Each of the chapters can also be read in isolation with ample. Post-Green Revolution food systems and the triple burden of malnutrition.

Miguel I. Gómez, Christopher B. Barrett, Terri Raney, Per Pinstrup-Andersen, Janice Meerman, André Croppenstedt, Sarah Lowder, Brian Carisma, and Brian Thompson. ESA Working Paper No. August Agricultural Development Economics Division. The Green Revolution was a period when the productivity of global agriculture increased drastically as a result of new advances.

During this time period, new chemical fertilizers and synthetic. Lessons from the old Green Revolution for the new: Social, environmental and nutritional issues for agricultural change in Africa Rachel Bezner Kerr Progress in. The Green Revolution, or Third Agricultural Revolution, is a set of research technology transfer initiatives occurring between and the late s, that increased agricultural production worldwide, particularly in the developing world, beginning most markedly in the late s.

The initiatives resulted in the adoption of new technologies, including high-yielding varieties (HYVs) of cereals. Green Revolution refers to the great rise in agricultural productivity brought about by new plant hybrids, fertilizers and agricultural chemicals in the 's and 's.

Green Revolution was advocated by the developed nations as a way to make developing nations food sufficient. resulted in increased soil degradation in the decades following the Green Revolution. Recent evidence suggests that soil degradation resulting from improper agricultural practices in the post Green Revolution period is a major factor in the observed decline in the yield response to input use in.

of Brown’s Seeds of Change book, the USDA released its Report and Recommendations on Organic Farming challenges facing a second Green Revolution based on organic agriculture by considering three sets of influences: 1.

technology, prices, and markets. The world needs green Revolution 2, which promises to feed a growing world population sustainably –without compromising the needs of future generations Need for second green revolution India has tremendous export potential in agriculture in present era of globalization.

In second Green Revolution emphasis should be laid on 1. In the pre-Green Revolution period, –50 to –65, about 51 per cent of the growth in agricultural output was accounted for by increase in area (which grew at per cent per year) and 49 per cent by increase in yield (which grew at per cent per year), that is, both area and yield increases were equally important in maintaining.

The beginnings of the Green Revolution are often attributed to Norman Borlaug, an American scientist interested in agriculture. In the s, he began conducting research in Mexico and developed new disease resistance high-yield varieties of combining Borlaug's wheat varieties with new mechanized agricultural technologies, Mexico was able to produce more wheat than was.

Byrlee D Maintaining the momentum in post-green revolution agriculture: A micro-level perspective from Asia.

MSU International Development Paper. ADVERTISEMENTS: Like other developing countries, Green Revolution has influenced the economy and way of life in India to a great extent as is evident from the following points: 1. Increase in Agricultural Production: The introduction of Green Revolution in has resulted in phenomenal increase in the production of agricultural crops especially in food-grains.

From [ ]. Post-Green Revolution problems However, despite the impressive results in terms of boosting cereal production, the Green Revolution has had significant problems of equity and in the stability and sustainability of production.3 For one, although producers have widely adopted the new HYVs irrespective of farm size and tenure, factors such as soil.

Changes in Green Revolution agriculture. Three decades ago, the collective response to the spectre of hunger resulted in what became known as the Green Revolution. In Green Revolution agriculture, the major change has been the improvement of irrigation systems, with upstream storages allowing the extension of cultivation into the dry season.

Maintaining the momentum in post-green revolution agriculture: a micro-level perspective from Asia / by Productivity improvement in rainfed areas in Asia Getting ready for the twenty-first century: technical change and institutional modernization in agricul.Agriculture: A Review of The Frontier Function Literature.

Agriculture and Resource Economics Review, 22(1): Byerlee, D. Maintaining the Momentum in Post-Green Revolution Agriculture: A Micro-level Perspective from Asia. MSU International Development Paper No.

University of Michigan. [1] India has one of the most intensive and spatially extensive irrigation systems in the world developed during thes under the agricultural Green Revolution (GR).

Irrigated landscapes can alter the regional surface energy balance and its associated temperature, humidity, and climate features. The main objective of this study is to determine the impacts of increased irrigation on long.